A Brutal Tool Of ISIS, Slavery Is Spreading Throughout The Muslim World

The ongoing stories coming from the Middle East about ISIS’ use of slavery, particularly slavery of a sexual nature, has caused outrage and revulsion even among hardened foreign policy analysts. The sad truth is that ISIS is not alone in using coercion and confinement to achieve its goals, reports The Economist.

The targeting of an entire sect might be unique to ISIS, but forced labor is not.

“From Morocco, where thousands of children work as petites bonnes, or maids, to the Syrian refugee camps in Jordan where girls are forced into prostitution, to the unsanctioned rape and abuse of domestics in the Gulf, aid workers say servitude is rife,” notes the magazine.

While their is acknowledgement in the Gulf states, there is no accountability for a practice that is uncomfortably common and out in the open.

“Rather than stop the abuse, Gulf officials prefer to round on their critics, accusing them of Islamophobia just as their forebears did. Oman and Saudi Arabia have long been closed to Western human-rights groups investigating the treatment of migrants. Now the UAE and Qatar, under pressure after a wave of fatalities among workers building venues for the 2022 World Cup, are keeping them out, too,” adds The Economist.

Sadly, there is not much difference between the governance of Daesh and much of the Muslim world. The theology from which much of the brutality and injustice are born varies only in the degree of the punishment carried out.

Much of the Muslim world is broken, tumultuous, morally corrupted and void of justice. We need an interpretation of Islam that is relevant for the 21st century — one that is pinned on a just system void of corruption. It is only with justice that peace can be attained.

To Ani Zonneveld, the founder and president of Muslims for Progressive Values, the similarities in governance between ISIS, which he refers to as Daesh, and many Middle Eastern extend beyond slavery practices.

“Sadly, there is not much difference between the governance of Daesh and much of the Muslim world. The theology from which much of the brutality and injustice are born varies only in the degree of the punishment carried out,” he writes in a recent Huffington Post column.

“Much of the Muslim world is broken, tumultuous, morally corrupted and void of justice. We need an interpretation of Islam that is relevant for the 21st century — one that is pinned on a just system void of corruption. It is only with justice that peace can be attained,” he continues.

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